A water-resistant Oyster case, large hour markers and bold hands are essential elements of Rolex’s Submariner, introduced in 1953 and made for use underwater. In contrast, Rolex’s Yacht-Master, launched in 1992, is a luxury liner – equally at home on board a yacht on the high seas or on land at a ritzy yacht club. But to enjoy this luxury you’ll need to pay almost $25,000 for the 40-mm Everose gold and Cerachrom ceramic version shown here. Stainless-steel versions of the Yacht-Master are priced about $13,000 less.

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The Yacht-Master was the first watch in Rolex’s Professional Oyster Collection to come in three different case sizes: 29, 35 and 40 mm.The watch is powered by a seasoned caliber, the Rolex 3135, used in the very first Yacht-Master in 1992. The 3135 debuted in 1988 in the Submariner. The blue Parachrom balance spring was added to the movement in 2005, five years after it was first introduced in the Cosmograph Daytona. Its paramagnetic alloy resists changes caused by temperature variations and magnetic fields.

The well-known Cyclops date lens was patented by Rolex in 1953 and introduced in 1954 on the Datejust. This magnifying device is made of sapphire, like the watch’s crystal, and has nonreflective coating on both sides. The jumping date advances exactly at midnight.

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The dial has a characteristic Rolex look. The applied markers and elongated triangle at 12 o’clock are filled with Rolex’s luminous substance, Chromalight, and are displayed on a matte black background. The hour hand has a “Mercedes” circle filled with Chromalight and the seconds hand has a luminous Chromalight dot. The stark contrast of black and white ensures excellent legibility during the day; at night the Chromalight emits a blue glow for easy reading in the dark.

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The Yacht-Master’s dial is easy to read day and night thanks to a strong black-and-white contrast and blue Chromalight luminescence.

 

SPECS:

Manufacturer: Rolex SA, Rue François-Dussaud 3-7, 1211 Geneva, Switzerland
Reference number: 116655
Functions: Hours, minutes, central seconds, date, bidirectional rotating bezel
Movement: In-house Caliber 3135, automatic, “Superlative Chronometer” certified, 28,800 vph, 31 jewels, Kif shock absorbers, Glucydur balance with Microstella regulating screws, Parachrom balance spring with overcoil, 48-hour power reserve, diameter = 28.5 mm, height = 6.0 mm
Case: Everose-gold Oyster case with black Cerachrom ceramic graduated bezel, sapphire crystal with Cyclops magnifying lens, water resistant to 100 m
Bracelet and clasp: Oysterflex bracelet with Everose-gold, single-sided Oysterlock folding clasp
Rate results: Deviations in seconds per 24 hours (Fully wound / after 24 hours)
Dial up +3.1 / +2.9
Dial down +2.1 / +3.2
Crown up -0.7 / -1.6
Crown down -0.8 / -2.6
Crown left +2.5 / +2.6
Greatest deviation of rate 3.9 / 5.8
Average deviation +1.2 / +0.9
Average amplitude:
Flat positions 292° / 265°
Hanging positions 247° / 233°
Dimensions: Diameter = 40 mm, height = 11 mm, weight = 154 g
Variations: 37-mm case (Ref. 268655, with Caliber 2236, $22,000)
Price: $24,950

 

Source: Watch Time

The Jaeger-LeCoultre Deep Sea Vintage Chronograph is a piece loosely inspired by the 1959 Memovox Deep Sea diving watch (below, photo courtesy of our friends at Monochrome Watches) — a piece that housed the first automatic alarm movement — but doesn’t have a long heritage of its own in the long history of the brand. Instead, the Deep Sea Vintage Chronograph seems like the diving watch JLC would have made if it had the inclination for an underwater chronograph a half-century ago.

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The Jaeger-LeCoultre Deep Sea Vintage Chronograph has a 40.5-mm steel case, containing within it the JLC Cal. 751G automatic movement, which holds a 65-hour power reserve. Within the Memovox-inspired bezel resides a black textured dial, complete with triangular hour markers colored with faux patina; two subdials to count up to 12 hours and 30 minutes, respectively; and a small cursive “Automatic” toward the 6 o’clock position. Other features to note are the long lugs previously popular in vintage diving chronographs, the plain chronograph pushers, and the unique hands that are popular on vintage Jaeger-LeCoultre pieces.

The watch, released a few years ago at SIHH 2012, can be found at various dealers for around $8,000.

 

Source WatchTime

 

Ulysse Nardin had Baselworld buzzing with the introduction of its ultra-complex Grand Deck Marine Tourbillon.

On the more classically elegant side, and not to be overlooked in this year’s new launches, is the Ulysse Nardin Classico Manufacture, which celebrates the Swiss brand’s 170th anniversary.

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The watch is limited to 170 pieces — one for each year of the Le Locle-based company’s existence — and powered by an in-house movement, Caliber UN-320, which is equipped with a silicon hairspring and Ulysse Nardin’s hallmark anchorescapement. The round stainless steel case measures 40 mm in diameter and 9.6 mm thick. It is water-resistant to 30 meters and has a nonreflective sapphire crystal over the dial and a screwed caseback with a sapphire window offering a view of the movement.

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The central hours and minutes display is complemented by a small seconds subdial and round date window at 6 o’clock. The watch also features a stop-seconds function, which enables accurate time-setting, and a date corrector that can be set both forward and backward. The self-winding movement holds a power reserve of 48 hours. The blue leather strap echoes the color of the hands, indices, and other blue dial details and has a stainless steel tang buckle.

The Ulysse Nardin Classico Manufacture 170th anniversary edition carries a retail price of $8,500.

 

Source: WatchTime

Breitling for Bentley B06 Midnight Carbon

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The latest chronograph watch to feature the brand’s in-house Caliber B06 movement, with the “30-second chronograph” system that Breitling patented in 1926.

When the stopwatch is engaged, the central hand sweeps around the dial in half a minute, ensuring extremely precise 1/8-second readings of elapsed times. The watch also features Breitling’s “variable tachymeter” scale (similar to the “circular slide rule” on its pilots’ watches), operated by the rotating bezel.

This new version of the watch, limited to 500 pieces, has a 49-mm satin-brushed steel case coated with a high-resistance black carbon-based treatment. Along with the collection’s hallmark knurled bezel, the watch is also outfitted with a black mother-of-pearl dial with matte chrono subdials and red and white indicators.

Price: $12,515.

Breitling Superocean 44 Special

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Known as the ‘ocean pilot’, it is shares much of the brand’s classic aviation-watch DNA with the properties of a professional-grade diving watch.

This version sports a 44-mm black steel case, black ceramic bezel, and “volcano black” dial with extra-large luminescent markers for visibility deep underwater. It’s fitted with a twin-gasket screw-locked crown, which helps guarantee the watch’s water-resistance to a depth of 1,000 meters (3,300 feet), and a unidirectional, ratcheted rotating bezel that is easy to grip while wearing diving gloves. The dial has large, baton-shaped hour and minute hands and a red-tipped seconds hand with a small luminescent triangle, another visual aid for a diver to check at a glance that his watch is running. The date appears in a window at 3 o’clock.

The movement is Breitling’s automatic Caliber 17, a COSC-certified chronometer with 25 jewels and a high frequency of 28,800 vph. The watch comes on either an “Ocean Racer” or “Diver Pro” strap and is priced at $4,980.

Source: Watch Time

Panerai Radiomir

Posted: May 13, 2016 in Panerai, tourbillion

On May 18, Officine Panerai will open “Panerai: Dive Into Time,” an exhibition showcasing the company’s history, in its birthplace city of Florence, Italy. The exhibition will also mark the debut of the new Panerai Radiomir 1940 Minute Repeater Carillon Tourbillon GMT, the most complicated Panerai watch ever made.

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The Panerai Radiomir 1940 Minute Repeater Carillon Tourbillon GMT – 49mm (Ref. PAM00600) is distinguished by its rare “double” minute repeater mechanism, which can be set to chime either the local time or that of a second time zone.

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The chiming mechanism is activated by a push-piece at 8 o’clock (above) and carried out by three hammers striking three gongs that are fixed to the movement and the case. Panerai chose three hammers, rather than the traditional two, to allow a combination of three different sounds, producing a more melodious, bell-likecarillon. As in a more traditional repeater, the first gong, identifying the hour, is the lowest, while the last, indicating the individual minutes, is highest. However, this watch adds a second, intermediate-note gong sounding triple chimes that correspond to ten-minute intervals instead of the traditional fifteen.

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The cushion-shaped, rose-gold Radiomir 1940 case, measuring 49 mm in diameter, is formed from two separate pieces soldered together in a structure that optimizes the empty spaces inside the case to enhance the sound propagation of the repeater chimes.

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As a designated Special Edition, the Panerai Radiomir 1940 Minute Repeater Carillon Tourbillon GMT is specifically made to order for clients. The brand has stated that it will also offer options for personalisation, which would includes not only the choice of strap, hands and other special features, but also possibly a choice of case materials other than rose gold. The price will be $400,000, depending on alterations.

 

Source: WatchTime

The Rolex Air King is a watch for younger people priced at only £4,500. The watch combines a more audacious design with the most advanced technology available at Rolex.

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The movement is hermetically shielded by a soft iron inner-case against magnetic fields. The diameter of the 904L-steel-case is 40 mm, it is waterproof up to 100 meters. The movement is precise to -2/+2 seconds per day and certified as a Superlative chronometer and has a power reserve of 48 hours. It is a 4 Hz-calibre equipped with Parachrom balance-spring.

 

Source: WatchTime

1868 — First Patek Philippe Wristwatch

In 1868, Patek Philippe began production of its first wristwatch: an ornate affair with a baguette-shaped, key-wound movement called Caliber 27368. It had a cylinder escapement and eight jewels. The watch’s case and bracelet were made of yellow gold. The dial was protected by a hinged cover adorned with large diamonds; more diamonds flanked both sides of the dial. In 1873, Patek Phillipe delivered the watch to the Countess Koscewicz of Hungary. The watch is now in the company’s museum.

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1925 — First Perpetual Calendar Wristwatch

That this, the world’s first perpetual calendar wristwatch, ever came to be is due chiefly to chance. Patek Philippe originally made the movement, which bears the number 97975, for a women’s pendant watch. Completed in 1898, the watch found no takers despite one interesting feature: its calendar hands jumped instantaneously to the next day at the stroke of midnight, rather than creeping forward slowly, as on conventional calendar watches. The watch stayed on the shelf until 1925, when the growing popularity of wristwatches inspired Patek Philippe to put the movement into a wristwatch case. The watch was finally sold on Oct. 13, 1927.

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1948 – Reference 2441 “Eiffel Tower”

This watch, Reference 2441, earned the nickname Eiffel Tower from its lugs, whose flared shape and squared-off ends bring to mind the tower’s bottom section. The watch, launched in 1948, was powered by Caliber 9-90, a tonneau-shaped movement that Patek Philippe launched in 1934. Reference 2441 is a favorite with collectors, thanks in part to its distinctive and flamboyant case. In 1997, Patek Philippe paid homage to that case. To mark the inauguration of its new factory and headquarters in Geneva that year, the company brought out a limited-edition watch with a rectangular case with flared lugs like those on the Eiffel Tower. The new watch also had a name inspired by architecture: the Pagoda.

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1976 — Reference 3700 Nautilus

In the 1970s, when quartz technology was gaining steam, mechanical-watch makers were eager to retain, or regain, consumers’ attention. For Patek Philippe, the Nautilus, introduced in 1976, and designed by the famous Gérald Genta, was a way to do so. At 42 mm in diameter, it was huge by the standards of the day, and had an unusually shaped, water-resistant (to 120 meters) steel case with two odd, ear-like projections on either side. But the most notable feature of Reference 3700, as the first Nautilus was designated, was its price: $2,350. At the time, steel luxury watches were still a rarity. For Patek Philippe, until then known exclusively for its precious-metal dress watches, a chunky, steel sports watch with an eye-popping price tag was news indeed. The watch was not an immediate hit, but later became one, earning the nickname “Jumbo” among collectors.

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2001 — Reference 5002 Sky-Moon Tourbillon

The Sky Moon Tourbillon, Reference 5002, was the most complicated wristwatch Patek Philippe had ever made. It was also the company’s first two-faced wristwatch. One side shows the time and a perpetual calendar, including a retrograde date indicator, day and month subdials, a moon-phase display and leap-year indicator. The watch’s other side shows sidereal time, a star map of the night sky and the angular motion of the moon. The tourbillon is not visible, but its presence is heralded by the word “tourbillon” inside the month subdial. The watch also has a minute repeater. The movement, which is manually wound, has 686 parts. When it was introduced, in 2001, the Patek Philippe Sky-Moon Tourbillon was priced at SF950,000 for the yellow-gold version shown here.

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Source: WatchTime